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Women through the lens of World War II Propaganda in the United States: Discourses on White and African American Women

Abstract : The largely surveyed experiences of white American middle-class women during World War II contrast sharply with the experiences of African American women. A look at home-front propaganda campaigns highlights the absence of Black women from mainstream propaganda. Yet, photos by and about black women during the war that can be consulted at the archives of the Library of Congress in Washington provide quite a different image and reveal, with no surprise, the extent to which these women were invisible warriors. In this article, American home-front propaganda specifically targeting women will be used as a grid to decipher and interpret the reality of the war for both white and African American women. What was the experience of white middle-class women? Why were black women rendered invisible? We will see that war propaganda helped shape the discourse on white American women in the 1940s and maintained the experience of African American women invisible.
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  • HAL Id : hal-03639101, version 1

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Christine Dualé. Women through the lens of World War II Propaganda in the United States: Discourses on White and African American Women. Miroirs : Revue des civilisations anglophone, ibérique et ibéro-américaine, Université Toulouse 1 Capitole, Département des Langues et Civilisations, 2016, 1 (4), pp.14-30. ⟨hal-03639101⟩

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